Waste facilities

Waste fees and charges FAQ

Waste disposal fees and charges are determined by Council each year.

Waste Disposal Fees - why are they set at the current rate?


Factors such as operating costs, introduction of the QLD Waste Disposal Levy and also legal requirements as set out in the Waste Reduction and Recycling Regulations influence the fees that are charged.

Waste Disposal Fees

 

Waste Levy - how does the Waste Levy affect Waste Disposal Fees?


The Queensland Government introduced a waste levy from 1 July 2019. The Qld Waste Levy has been incorporated into Councils fees and charges to cover the costs associated with the waste levy.

Waste Disposal Levy

 

Green Waste - why does Council charge for disposal when they sell it back as mulch?

The fees charged for disposing of green waste directly relate to these processing costs and are used for services such as engaging commercial providers to process green waste and produce the mulch.

 

No kerbside service - why do I get charged to dispose my waste at a Waste Facility?

Residents outside of Councils “Designated Waste Service Area” do not have a waste collection charge included in their rates. All residents who self-haul are charged to dispose of waste. A standard kerbside collection equates to around $6.70 per week.

 

Commercial Cardboard / Recycling - why is there a charge?

Fees for handling commercial quantities of cardboard and co-mingled recyclables are charged to cover transportation and handling costs. Customers should look at options such as Bundaberg Paper and Cardboard who have a free drop off service for cardboard.

 

Mattresses - why is there a separate charge?


The fee for mattress disposal is to cover costs involved in handling and managing their disposal. Mattresses are costly to process because:

  • They take up a large amount of space in landfill
  • They create voids when buried in landfill which increases leachate production – which Council needs to contain and reduce
  • These “voids” often result in buried mattresses working their way to the surface and requiring rehandling for disposal
  • They are a fire hazard

Council is currently looking at alternatives for recycling mattresses such as working with not-for-profit and local commercial operators.

 

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